Resiliency Matters

Resiliency Matters

You just never know when the next curveball is coming your way. Life is full of inconsistencies, ups and downs, and unexpected events that can shake a person to the core. It happens in business; it happens in our personal lives and it happens to us all.

Recognizing you’re not alone when life tests your emotional resolve is a good starting point for developing resiliency. History is full of stories about people who have overcome unthinkable circumstances. Also, there are the people we know personally, our co-workers, neighbors, friends and family members who have endured the unexpected and have carried on. There are models of resiliency all around us that we can look to for inspiration.

Fostering Appreciation

Fostering Appreciation

In one of our recent blogs, Choosing Optimism, I cited a statistic from Forbes Magazine that stated 79% of employees leave their jobs due to a perceived lack of appreciation. Survey findings on this topic vary and many used similar terms like “unnoticed “or “ignored.” The overwhelming trend that employees want to feel valued at work suggest that further scrutiny of this topic is warranted.

 All work places have a hierarchy for job positions. The opportunities for advancement are limited, so the promise of a promotion or a pay raise as an inspirational tool, is in many cases, unrealistic. So how do we help our employees feel valued?

Choosing Optimism

Choosing Optimism

“The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true.” 
― James Branch Cabell

Training ourselves to view challenges and difficult work scenarios through the lens of optimism reduces stress and contributes to a more productive, problem-solving environment. Employees who approach work through an optimistic point of view are usually the ones who exceed expectations and enjoy a more rewarding work experience.

The Integrity Bridge

The Integrity Bridge

Relationships rely on integrity. We trust stores will give us a fair price. We presume distributors will represent us fairly in the marketplace. We expect healthcare providers to make decisions in our best interest. Especially in the legal realm, we count on Judges to use good judgement.

It’s no different inside our companies. Employees expect to be treated fairly. We trust our coworkers to be honest in their communications with us. We want and expect a “what you see is what you get” environment. And when this environment is achieved, productivity increases, and turnover is reduced.

Your Resume and Your Eulogy

Your Resume and Your Eulogy

I listened to a Ted Talk with speaker David Brooks who introduced the virtues of our two selves represented by our resume and our eulogy. 

You can visual these two parts of ourselves first by the way we draft our resume, usually during a time of transition. We summarize the value of our education and work history. We list our core skills and any accolades we have earned along the way. We hope those who read our resume will also see growth, vision, and a continued pattern of improvement. We’ll refer to these characteristics as our outward selves.

Knowing Your Leadership Style is Key

Knowing Your Leadership Style is Key

What is your leadership style?  Whether you are the CEO or you manage a team of 2, you have a style.  Do you tell everyone exactly what you expect and how to get it done or do you ask for input on the outcome of a project?  Are you disappointed when a project is late but can't tell where it went off the rails? Or are you involved in every step of each team members process?  Or are you somewhere in between?

Are you Googly? Zapponian? Patagonian? Company culture as a way of life.

Are you Googly? Zapponian? Patagonian? Company culture as a way of life.

Engaging, inspiring company cultures like Google, Zappos and Pattagonia aren’t build in a day.  They’re the result of a conscious effort to engage each member of the company in a core vision mission and values that are about more than just making a buck. To create an inspiring company culture you’ll need to do more than just a one day workshop to team build or add a ping pong table to the break room, you’ll need to examine your core beliefs.